Pere Lachaise and some Monday exploring

We didn’t have to meet until 1 p.m. on Monday for class, so Emily and I explored around the Tuileries Gardens and Place Vendome in the morning.  I couldn’t find a good diagram on the internet to show it, but the Louvre, Tuileries Gardens, and Place de la Concorde (where the Egyptian obelisk is and where the guillotine was) all line up along the Seine, with the Place Vendome next to the end of the Tuieleries.  The Eiffel Tower is a bit farther down the Seine and the Musee d’Orsay is directly across the river bank, so this area is very beautiful and offers a great view of many of the city’s sights.  

The Place de la Concorde is an square with a monument to Napoleon’s conquests in the middle.  Stores like Dior and Chanel line the edge, so unfortunately all I could afford was to window shop.  Most prices were not marked, but the ones that were had 5 digits, so I can’t imagine how much the unmarked prices were.  

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I absolutely loved the blue earrings in this store's window.
I absolutely loved the blue earrings in this store’s window.
When I'm a eccentric old rich lady I want a flamingo ring like that
When I’m a eccentric old rich lady I want a flamingo ring like that.

We went to a cafe for breakfast, and their fixed menu included a croissant, bread with butter, espresso, and lemon press (all for 8,50 euro!).  I hadn’t heard of a lemon press before, but it’s lemon juice or concentrate in a glass and you can add water and sugar to taste.  It was a more authentic lemonade and was really tasty.  

For class we visited Père Lachaise cemetery (pronounced pair la-shez), which is the biggest cemetery in Paris.  It was started in the 1800s as a nondenominational, cross-class burial place because the church graveyards were getting too crowded.  It was placed in the eastern end of the city because the wealthy didn’t want it in the center of Paris near them (how nice).  

The cemetery is huge and is the final resting place of Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison, Jacques Louis David (my favorite!), Gertrude Stein, Baron Haussman, and countless other famous French people (and some non-French, like Jim Morrison).  We had two scavenger hunts to complete but with the immensely hot weather and size of the cemetery it took us longer than expected and we missed the graves of Oscar Wilde and Jacques Louis David, who were my top two to see.  

The grave of Abelard and Heloise, medieval lovers who had a tragic end.  Abelard established the Sorbonne.
The grave of Abelard and Heloise, medieval lovers who had a tragic end. Abelard established the Sorbonne.
Jim Morrison's (of the Doors) grave
Jim Morrison’s (of the Doors) grave
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One of the windy roads of Pére Lachaise

After we were done with class I was not feeling well from the heat and past crangry (our group likes to mix hungry and whatever emotion we are in, so tired + hungry = tungry, grumpy + hungry = grungry, etc., so I was cranky + hungry).  We went to Chatelet, which is in more of the center of the city, and ate at a cafe. 

Afterwards, we explored some stores on the Rue de Rivoli and then read in the Tuileries Gardens.  It was 9 p.m. and the sun was just beginning to set, which made for some pretty pictures.  

A wing of the Louvre as seen from the Tuileries Gardens.  The Eiffel Tower is in the right but you can't see it with the sun.
A wing of the Louvre as seen from the Tuileries Gardens. The Eiffel Tower is in the right but you can’t see it with the sun.
The Tuileries Gardens and a view of the buildings and stores along Rue de Rivoli
The Tuileries Gardens and a view of the buildings and stores along Rue de Rivoli
Sunset in the Tuileries
Sunset in the Tuileries
Sunset along the Rue de Rivoli looking towards the Place de la Concorde
Sunset along the Rue de Rivoli looking towards the Place de la Concorde

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